Communion at Greenbriar Church

Since late 2015, Greenbriar Church has been celebrating weekly communion each Sunday. We are thankful for the opportunity to celebrate Christ in this way. Yet, like many weekly activities, it is good to be reminded of communion's importance so that this time does not become something begrudging or tiresome.

One of our Core Values at Greenbriar is to "Open Up". We value transparency. Several of our Partners, guests, and attenders now being familiar with our practice of weekly communion have spoken to staff and elders about the weekly practice. These comments are not harmful but rather are good for the growth of the individual as well as the church. We want to thank you for sharing your views. In response to weekly communion, we have heard statements such as, "weekly communion feels religious," "do the elder's have to explain communion each week," "people who do not take communion feel awkward," "people have left during communion."

We would like to share some practical ways in which communion can be a powerful part of the gathering, whether it is a weekly, monthly, or quarterly activity in a local body. Our hope is to help establish the practice of communion as a time of refreshing celebration. In the same way that we do not get tired of singing songs, serving one another, or hearing from the Word of God, communion is to be an ever-increasing joy in the life of the believer.

1. Communion sets the table for your response to the sermon.

Communion is different for you as you process the message that was just preached through questioning, repentance, and submission to Christ through the gospel. Communion is remembering Christ's work. Salvation is broken into three parts: Justification, Sanctification, Glorification. I won't go into detail with the three parts here, but his work on the cross was for our salvation (justification). The joy of communion is to know that you are still in need of growth as a believer. It is Christ's work that continues to give you forgiveness for sins you recognized in yourself from the message and a reminder of the power you have over that sin, in Christ, because of his work (sanctification). Taking communion is fresh because you learn more about Christ that week through the message and are able to confess sin, failure, be forgiven and follow Christ in a new way.

2. Communion is a reminder that no matter what your background or status we are all in need of the same Source.

The culture tries to define us. The culture wars, social injustices and it's ailments are bashing each of us into each other. With everyone trying to be different and be celebrated for their differences, Christians come together to learn how our differences are not primary to our identity, but rather that Christ is. It is God who defines us. Communion is a time to celebrate that each person is equal at the cross of calvary. Our identity finds it's greatest joy not in being more individually but in being together. This humbles everyone. Neither your wealth nor your poverty will get you into heaven. Your religious self-control or wrongly-viewed grace without judgement won't get you into heaven. It is by calling on Christ alone. We need a weekly reminder of our need for Christ no matter where you may be on the spectrum of any issue or circumstance.

3. Communion is a reminder that we all need something outside of ourselves.

Again, the culture spreads the idea of self-glorification for the betterment of the soul. Go into any major secular bookstore. In each store, the self-help section is filled with books about how you can fix yourself through self-reflection and behavioral modification. But if you are the problem you can't also be the solution or at least not a sustaining one. Here is where communion matters: instead of believing that you can fix yourself this week as you have done in the past, you call out to the Lord. We cannot save ourselves. Taking communion is our reminder that it is Someone outside of us who now resides in us who has the power to deliver, and not our own will.

4. Communion is about eating together.

When Jesus and the disciples had Passover they had a meal. Pieces of bread or wafers and juice is not a first-choice pick at your favorite restaurant, but it does symbolize something important to any community of believers: communion. We come to partake. We are eating from the same table. We are family. We worship through song, service, preaching, eating and drinking. We have the privilege of becoming more unified as one body as we leave the time of communion. Communion is reviving and changing the body each week.

We may not always have a weekly communion. But there is no doubt in our hearts that each time a church takes communion every believer can grow in joy, happiness, and mission through its practice. Like all things Christ gives to us, Communion becomes an ever-increasing joy as we partake in remembrance of his grace and promises!

If you would like to read a Biblical teaching on Communion please click here: http://timbice.com/archives/362

Written by: John Schroeder, Elder & Executive Pastor

Greenbriar Church and Samaritan's Purse (Albany Storm) 

Posted by John Schroeder

It's not every day that I am removing tree branches from the middle of my street in complete darkness, in the rain while wearing shorts and blue sandals. I can still hear the sounds of my neighbor's chainsaw cutting the trees down so that I could move them. Watching neighbors step outside of their homes with flashlights, trying to comprehend the damage around them. It only took about 90 seconds, but it will take weeks to recover. That was my Monday night.

Since Monday evening the city of Albany has done a fantastic job trying to put back what we can. Local businessmen have taken time away from their jobs to bring heavy equipment to move large trees. Volunteers are showing up throughout each day. I have seen more of my neighbors in the past two days than in the past five years that I have been living on 6th Avenue. For a city that gets in a lot of trouble when things are "the norm," this tragedy has caused boys to be men.

The local churches have been a huge encouragement to my family and my neighbors. Seeing churches come through with food, water, and hands is the gospel on display.

Greenbriar Church is one of the churches. I worked with a crew Monday for 10 hours and another team Tuesday for 6 hours. The before and after pictures are mind-blowing (Thanks, Greenbriar Peeps!). The church has opened its doors to the Phoebe nursery (Family Tree) until they get power. We also have posted a table filled with food and snacks for neighbors and volunteers on 6th Avenue for the past two days.

 
 

Greenbriar wants to continue to make an impact during this time. With so many needs we wanted to find someone who was centralizing information and needs. We, along with several churches, have joined up with Samaritan's Purse. SP is working to communicate with churches and organizations the needs of our city throughout the day. They have morning and afternoon volunteering opportunities for the next month. As a church; we never want to go rouge, doing our own thing so that we work against the city. Rather we want to help. We stand by our mission, For this City (that means for our neighbors and even beyond!). Sending volunteers to help with Samaritan's Purse will benefit the community and send our Partners and guests into an organized effort. If you have any questions about how you can get involved, you can call the office or email us. If you have rooms available for Partners or guests, let us know. If you want to drop off food or water give us a heads up. We can take those things to SP or the Avenues ourselves. If you are in need, please reach out. We will make some calls to help in any way we can.This is the fastest way to reach us: info@greenbriarchurch.net .

Displaying needs a Declaring!

As disciples of Jesus (A disciple is a follower and learner of Jesus who is reproducing other followers and learners of Jesus), we are called to display and declare the gospel of Jesus. Displaying the gospel will be the easy part. Helping with shelter efforts, bringing food and water, moving trees away from homes, cleaning up yards, giving people a hug is simple, tangible, and needed. As the Church, I want to encourage each of you to think long term! Build relationships, listen, share your testimony of loss (and gain in Christ), point them to Christ, invite them to Greenbriar (pick them up for the Sunday service if necessary). Tell people why you are there (because Jesus was kind, loving, and generous to you first!). Let them hear you talk amongst yourselves about Christ's love and affection towards you while you are working. Pray with them concerning the next few weeks. Give them GB invite cards with your favorite scriptures on it. Go back and see them later or invite them over for dinner!

If you need Samaritan's Purses time and contact info you can follow this link: https://spvolunteernetwork.samaritanspurse.org/albany-ga-tornado-response/

Thank you for everything you're already doing to be "For this city". Continue displaying and declaring the good news of Jesus to those around you.

Seeing And Savoring Jesus in Family Discipleship

Family discipleship is a rich opportunity for you display the gospel of Jesus Christ to your kids through parenting. As you engage your family with the gospel, it's helpful to realize that family discipleship is a multi-faceted design giving your family a holistic and healthy approach to becoming learners, followers and reproducers of Jesus.

There are four elements at work as you disciple your family:

  1.    The parent’s personal relationship with Christ
  2.    The parent's relationship with the family
  3.    Each family member’s individual relationship with Christ
  4.    Their family's relationship with the Church.

All of these elements are important to family discipleship. Before diving into each of these elements, though, it is essential to understand that parents are intended by God to be the primary disciplers of their children (Deuteronomy 6:4-9).  We, the Church, have two main roles in family discipleship.  First, we are the secondary voice of discipleship for your kids, reinforcing Biblical, Gospel truths and affirming the parents’ authority given by God.  Second, we want to teach and equip you as parents to take this holistic approach in your family discipleship.

Our desire is to teach and equip you as parents. We are eager to do that through blog posts that address each of the four elements of family discipleship.  This post will focus on the first of those four elements: “The parent's personal relationship with Christ.”

Family discipleship begins with how parents seek and savor Jesus. 

To be effective disciple makers of Jesus, you must have been and continue to be transformed by the gospel. If Jesus is a second thought to parents, discipleship will not be lived out before their children. Knowing the difference between taking children "to church" and allowing your children to see you "being the church no matter where you are" is key to family discipleship. If Jesus is just a church word parents use for behavioral modification (i.e., telling them to, “Stop that behavior because Jesus doesn’t like that,” saving yourself from public embarrassment), parents may cause their kids to become disciples of good behavior, but not disciples of Jesus Christ. 

So parents, how do you know you are personally trusting in Christ? Here are some questions to consider. When was the last time you trusted in the gospel for a family, work, or church decision? When was the last time you trusted and acted on the gospel instead of the sinful desire welling up within you? When was the last time you actually confessed sin to your family or small group because you knew that you didn't have to hide your sin from others since Christ died to set you free of shame and guilt? When was the last time you acted in faith and loved someone who didn't deserve it because you were reminded of God's great love for you on the cross, giving you forgiveness and new life despite all of your rebellion, rejection, and sin toward Him? 

Even if our children never receive Christ, our children will be convinced that we truly believe Jesus is everything He said He was by the way we live out that belief in front of them. 

This is not the mindset that most of us grew up with, and it can be difficult when you grew up in a culture of "going to church every time the doors were open". But we have to change our mindset. We have to grow up in the gospel ourselves. How do you do that? You must train your mind to focus on Christ (Romans 12:2-3; Philippians 4:8-9). As a parent, you must be reminded of the truths of the gospel and lean on the power of gospel every single day (Titus 2:11-15). You must wake up, work, play, and sleep the gospel truths for your life (2 Peter 1:3-10). And when you recognize your lack of love and loyalty to Christ, you can stop and worship the Lord in that same moment because the gospel has done the work you failed to do, granting you complete access to the Father (Colossians 1:13, Ephesians 2:1-10).

Training your mind to see Christ takes practice. 

You can be reminded of His great love by practicing spiritual disciplines or “means of grace.” As Tim taught us in the Rhythms series at the start of 2017, many spiritual disciplines can be divided up into three major sections: hearing God's voice (scripture and meditation), having God's ear (prayer and fasting), and communing with God's people (small groups).

Spiritual disciplines seem hard, but thankfully God has not made himself difficult. As we set our life to his design, we prosper. God does the transforming (2 Corinthians 3:18)! Our job as believers is to get in his path! We get into his path when we engage in a rhythm of spending time with Him. You need a time, place and plan for the spiritual disciplines in your life. Be diligent. Surround yourself with a gospel community who is ready to serve. Dallas Willard said, "Grace is not opposed to effort, but to earning." Take the next step in glorifying the Father through knowing more of Christ. 

Living in light of the gospel will transform how you see God's design for parenting. You will experience the perfect parent-to-child relationship that God has with you which is rooted in love. As you continue to experience this transformation, you will treat others--including your children--with the same grace you have received and are now receiving. You will give abundantly because you are now more aware of the abundant grace afforded you. 

Your relationship with Jesus Christ as a parent is a crucial element for you in discipling your kids in a holistic way because you are tapping into a key element of any discipleship relationship, which is “demonstration.”  Dawson Trotman, founder of the Navigators ministry, explains that “Discipleship is more caught than taught.”  When your kids see you loving and following Jesus, they are more likely catch on and do it themselves.   

Parents, if you are reading this and feel far from the grace and love of God we want you to know that in Christ we are no longer defined by what we have done or will do, but rather by the word and work of Jesus. If you not have repented of your sin and placed faith in Christ for forgiveness and restoration of your life, both now and forever, God has made this truth available to you in Christ! You will become a new person with a beautiful identity (2 Corinthians 5:17) in Christ as a son or daughter (Romans 8:14-15). A new identity also includes a new family. We, the church, are that new family. Please share with us what the Lord is doing in your life. 

Who Is Responsible for Church Discipline?

Posted by Tim Bice

I think most Believers automatically think that the pastor, elders, or leaders of the church are the ones to handle all church discipline issues within the church. However, that is not always true. To help us understand it better, Jay Adams in his book, “Handbook of Church Discipline,” distinguishes between “informal” and “formal” church discipline.1

Informal discipline

Informal church discipline is actually carried out among brothers and sisters of Christ within the church. Informal discipline includes the first two steps Jesus outlines in Matthew 18:15-16. If a brother is in sin, go to him in truth AND love. Go to him not only to warn him, but also to counsel him. If the person in question does not repent, then witnesses are called in. The witnesses are to be objective, listening to the cases of both the charged and the one charging; they are not there just to support the one charging. These steps are considered “informal” discipline that can and should be done by church partners (members).

A warning

This is not a green light for gung-ho church members that get off on confronting the sin of others. “Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye?”(Matthew 7:3) This verse reminds us that we are not perfect and need to observe our own life as well. We always approach others in truth AND love. Like a friend once told me, “I don’t want to be so truthful that I’m unloving but on the other hand I don’t want to be so loving that I’m untruthful.” I might add that this process should be slow enough to give the charged time to repent, but quick enough that it doesn’t linger forever.

Formal discipline

Formal discipline starts in the third step of Jesus’ instructions (Matthew 18:17) where witnesses are instructed to tell the church of the unrepentant sin of the charged. This is where the elders/pastors formally get involved and where it becomes serious. There are also times when serious public situations occur such as in 1 Corinthians 5 where a man was sleeping with his father’s wife and the whole community knew about it. If a church partner commits a public sin, the elders need to go directly into formal church discipline with the hope of repentance and restoration in mind.

Accusations against an elder/pastor

There must be more than one person to bring accusations against an elder/pastor. “Do not admit a charge against an elder except on the evidence of two or three witnesses.”

The divisive person

Just like a good husband/father won’t let a disruptive person continually harm his family and home, neither should churches allow divisive people bent on harming the church remain in the body. In these types of cases or when a wolf begins to divide the church, the elders will act swiftly (Titus 3:10). Shepherds must protect the sheep! (Acts 20:28-29)

The church and excommunication

Excommunication sounds very harsh…until you really look at what it means. Jonathan Leeman says it best, “It’s excommunicating, or ex-communion-ing…

to excommunicate is ‘to exclude from fellowship, which is to remove from the Lord’s Table, which is ‘to formally discipline.”2 This is always done for the good of the person, the health of the church and the protection Jesus’ reputation. At this point in the discipline process, the whole church (partners only) come together to hear the elders recommendations concerning the charged. It comes full circle – back to the members – the body. The church body may decide to give more time for the charged to repent, or they may see that the charged is unwilling to repent and, therefore the church can no longer vouch for his profession of faith. The end goal is never “kick them out,” or “get them away from us.” The main goal is always the same – reconciliation, repentance, and restoration; but there will be times when people will not accept the church’s discipline and we must “deliver this man to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord.” (2 Corinthians 5:5). Even the act of excommunication is for his good.

If the charged ever gets to this point, the church does not shun him, but continues to reach out to him. The disciplined person is made welcome in the services and gatherings except for Lord’s Supper and partnership meetings. He is to be treated “as a heathen and a tax collector,” (Matthew 18:18). In other words, like an unbeliever. Each church has plenty of unbelievers coming to their meetings and this man should be no different. The church continues loving him and asking him to repent for his own good, the church’s health, and the reputation of Jesus’ name. Until he repents, the church body cannot eat or mingle with him, (1 Corinthians 5:11).

1 Handbook of Church Discipline. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Ministry Resources Library, 1986. Print.

2 Church Discipline How the Church Protects the Name of Jesus. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2012.

Why Do We Practice Church Discipline?

Posted by Tim Bice

1. Church Discipline is Biblical.

Both Paul and Jesus commissioned church discipline (Matthew 18:15-181 Corinthians 5Tit 3:10). As Christians, our authority and source for life is God’s Word. It’s the Bible that teaches church discipline is needed.

2. Church Discipline is part of the process of discipleship. 

Discipleship has two arms: a) it is formative. b) it is corrective. In other words, not only are we supposed to care for one another, teach one another, bear one another’s burdens (formative), we are also called to help correct sin in our brothers’ and sisters’ lives (Galatians 6:1James 5:19-20) in order for them to grow as disciples of Jesus.

3. Church Discipline is an act of love.

If our view of God and His gospel is only a partial view, it becomes a weak view. Many believe the gospel is only about forgiveness – a “love without repentance” sort of gospel. Though that is partly true, there is also another element to the gospel. We are definitely forgiven in Christ; but God disciplines us because He LOVES us (Heb 12:6-11). God’s desire is for believers to be shaped into the image of Christ (Rom 8:29). This is a loving desire and as Christ’s body, the church, we are to lovingly correct sin in hope for repentance in our brothers and sisters – not because we are mean or self-righteous, but because we want to love them toward Jesus.

4. Church Discipline serves as a reminder and warning about the danger of sin to the rest of the church.

As we live in a world where sin no longer shocks us, it should be the responsibility of the church to remind one another of the importance of confession and repentance, and the danger of sin.

5. Church Discipline foreshadows what is to come when Jesus judges the world.

Matthew 25 reveals Jesus judging between sheep and goats – the saved and the lost. This is a future reality, and church discipline is a foreshadowing of that reality.

6. Church Discipline increases the health of the church.

We read in 1 Corinthians 5:6-7, “Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump? [7] Cleanse out the old leaven…” Just like cancer being removed from the body promotes health, so does unrepentant sinners removed from the Lord’s Supper and membership in the body of Christ. We don’t “kick out” the unrepentant sinner from assembling or hearing God’s Word preached. There is nothing keeping the disciplined person from coming to our general assemblies (Matthew 18:17). However, there are cases when divisive people should be put out of our midst after being warned once or twice (Titus 3:10).

7. Church Discipline shows outsiders that there is a difference between the church and the world.

Most all things in our society work on an accountability basis. For example our jobs, sports, and families all work best when formative and corrective training is taking place. The world understands this. When the world sees the church practicing accountability in truth and love, it takes notice.

8. Church Discipline upholds the reputation and the name of Jesus. 

This is the greatest reason for me personally. We are created in God’s image and once adopted by Him, we are IN CHRIST – that means “in His position.” We, as a church body, are to reflect Him and uphold His reputation.

What is Church Discipline?

Let’s be honest, in today’s day and time, Church Discipline sounds mean spirited. I think it’s because of two reasons: a) the connotation of the word “discipline” is negative, and b) because many churches have done it so poorly. Let me address both issues.

First, the English word “discipline” used to carry the sense of concern, prevention, and education. Discipline and correction were not necessarily synonyms, but were two separate things. It was later that the word “correction” was caught up in the English Word “discipline.” 1 The word “discipline” was actually meant to be POSITIVE rather than negative.

Secondly, many churches have made a wreck out of this practice! Many of us have witnessed tons of “dead bodies” that have been run over by legalistic, self-righteous church leaders driving the bus of “church discipline” to “rid troublemakers” from all aspects of church. However, biblical church discipline is motivated by LOVE, not by condemnation (see my blog post on “Why We Practice Church Discipline”). When done properly, church discipline helps the person, sustains the church, and upholds Jesus’ reputation.

Church Discipline IS NOT:

-kicking people to the curb

-condemning others by tossing them out of the church

-unloving or mean spirited

-unbiblical

Church Discipline IS:
-Loving toward the person, the church, and the name of Jesus

-A part of the discipleship process

-Biblical

The heart behind Church Discipline is the discipleship process where the church corrects sin and lovingly points the disciple toward Jesus.

Our working definition of Church Discipline is “a disciplinary action motivated by love and performed by the church towards an unrepentant church partner who is unwilling to set aside sin that is hurting a) himself, b) the church, and c) the reputation of Jesus, all in the hope of restoration.”

What kind of sins call for church discipline?

So, what are the exact sins that need to be corrected? Jonathan Leeman helps us to think wisely about what kind of sins need discipline. He teaches that formal church discipline is usually warranted when an individual crosses from sins we expect to sins we don’t.2 In other words, you may expect a new Christian with no religious background to possibly sin in some prevalent ways. However, you don’t expect an elder to sin in the same way. Both men need to be confronted – the new believer in a formative way, and the elder in a corrective way. Each case will be different and everything should be considered. The end goal is always the same – reconciliation, repentance, and restoration. That never changes. That takes time, love, sacrifice, wisdom, and prayer.

The church’s role

When a person chooses to join a church, the church does its best to conclude whether or not the person has made a believable profession of faith in the Lord, Jesus Christ. If the church comes to that conclusion then it AFFIRMS the person’s salvation, and he is received into membership. The church doesn’t determine a person’s salvation, but it vouches for the person that he belongs to Christ. Formal church discipline takes place when a person’s failure to represent Christ becomes so habitual and characteristic that the church body no longer believes that member is a Christian. That means the church member has fallen into a sin from which he won’t repent – even after loving brothers, sisters, and elders warn him and try to help him. If he remains unrepentant, the church will make a determination that it can no longer AFFIRM the individual’s profession of faith. In the same way the church affirms a person’s salvation, it also has the authority (Matthew 18:18) to no longer affirm a person’s salvation. When this happens, the person is NOT kicked out of the church, but removed from membership and participation in the Lord’s Supper. The church will allow the person to continue coming to the general assemblies and events. This follows the commands of Jesus to treat an unrepentant person like a heathen and tax collector (Matthew 18:17). However, if the person is divisive and has been warned once or twice, then he is to be removed from the midst of the body (Titus 3:10). Church discipline is always to help the person, sustain the church, and uphold Jesus’ reputation.

Hope for restoration:

When a sinning brother repents, the church forgives and restores. It’s as simple as that. That’s what the church desired all along. We should rejoice like the father did with his prodigal son.

1 Handbook of Church Discipline. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Ministry Resources Library, 1986.

2 Church Discipline How the Church Protects the Name of Jesus. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2012.

For more about Church Discipline, listen to this sermon.

Part 3 of 3: What is Pastoral Care, Small Group?

How Does Small Group Care Work?

For many years, the pastor has been expected to be the primary caregiver in the church. Should a pastor be a caring shepherd to the church? Yes, but the Scriptures command pastors to be the lead caretaker, rather than the sole caretaker within the body. It commands the body to care for one another. As a matter of fact, there are fifty-nine “one another” commands in the

New Testament. Here are just a few:

  •  “Carry each other’s burdens...” (Galatians 6:2)
  •  “...Be patient, bearing with one another in love.” (Ephesians 4:2)
  •  “Confess your sins to each other...” (James 5:16)
  •  “Speak to one another with psalms, hymns and spiritual songs.” (Ephesians 5:19)
  •  “Be kind and compassionate to one another...” (Ephesians 4:32)
  •  “...Pray for each other.” (James 5:16)
  •  “...Love one another deeply, from the heart.” (I Peter 3:8)
  •  “...Admonish one another (Colossians 3:16)
  •  “...Make your love increase and overflow for each other.” (I Thessalonians 3:12)

For too long people have treated the church like a restaurant and not a family. In a restaurant, you walk in and expect to be served. However, in a family, you are committed to serving one another. Our church is a family, and we are to serve one another. The primary way for this to take place is within small groups, where intimate relationships are cultivated and sincere care for one another flourishes.

So, the question remains, how does care within groups work? Here are a few practical ways care works in small groups:

  1. First of all, members of a small group should pray for and with one another. Prayer can take place in your weekly meetings, or it can happen one-on- one when needs arise. You can pray for those in your group and ask those in your group to pray for you. Prayer is cherished when everything is going great or when everything is falling apart.
  2. In times of need, members and leaders of your small group are like first responders. Your small group leader or designated caregiver in the group is your first contact when a crisis happens and your second contact should be your pastor. Your group can pray for you, organize a meal train for you, handle tasks or errands for you, or help with any other practical needs that arise from a crisis.
  3.  If you are in need of care, encouragement, and prayer, don’t assume everyone in your group, or your pastor knows it just because you posted something to social media. Make sure to text or call your group and your pastor when you have an urgent need.
  4.  Give permission for others in your group to care for you. It’s easy to isolate yourself when things get hard, but remember we are eager to follow the “one another”commands in the Bible. Don’t rob another person of the opportunity to obey God by loving you well.
  5.  Usually, when we think of “care,” we mean it in a reactive sense.  Something bad happens in someone’s life, and so people get involved to “care” for them. However, there is a proactive way we can care for others within our groups through discipleship. In the same way, you are being equipped by your elders to live life on mission, you equip others in your group to do the same. You will be best “cared for” when you are growing and thriving in being part of making disciples through your small group.
  6.  Lastly, be careful not to have unrealistic expectations of what care will look like. It may not turn out just like you think it should. But as long as other people are praying for you, checking on you, helping you, loving you, and encouraging you in the mission of your life to be a disciple who makes disciples, you can be grateful.

We desire to care for your needs, especially when the needs are significant (hospital, birth, death).  Having a small group of gospel-centered people and having loving pastors care for you is both Biblical and practical. This is the kind of culture you can flourish in.

Part 2 of 3- What is Pastoral Care, Expectations

What Can You Expect from Your Pastor?

Our comprehensive shepherding plan centers on assigning every partner to a pastor/elder. This assigning does two things:

1. It gives our partners a clear understanding of who is responsible for their spiritual care.

2. It gives our pastors a clear expectation of the partners he is responsible for.

You may, however, still be unsure of what to expect from your pastor, so we are giving you our list of pastoral expectations.

1. Relationship

What this means:

Part of shepherding care is to “know,” the flock and knowing requires that the elders/pastors can identify the sheep for whom they are accountable to the Lord. Therefore, your pastor will have a relationship with you rather than being totally disengaged from your life. One of the ways he will do this is in the next point – he makes shepherding calls to you a couple of times a year. Another way he may do this is by occasionally visiting your small group. To make things simple, we have assigned whole small groups to one pastor so that we can better shepherd through an entire small group and its leader. Also, from time to time, a pastor may get two or three of the groups that he is shepherding together for a time of fellowship. For partners that are not in a group, they will still be assigned to a pastor, and they will be encouraged to join a group.  These are just a few ways your pastor intends on nurturing relationships with dozens of assigned partners.

What this doesn’t mean:

The reality for all of our pastors is a tremendously busy life. With young children, businesses, jobs, ministries, and the task of shepherding dozens of people, things can get hectic. Therefore, it would be unrealistic to think you can hang out with your pastor every night or talk over the phone for hours on end. Please understand our deep love for you and that we are available to you. We just want everyone’s expectations to be realistic.

2. Shepherding Calls

What this means:

So many times in ministry, pastors react to the needs of people yet never take the time to be proactive with people. While we will respond to needs of our partners, we also desire to be proactive by making at least two shepherding calls a year to our assigned partners. In these calls, your pastor will check on your spiritual health and growth primarily focusing on how you are doing with discipleship by asking about your following, learning, and reproducing of Jesus.

There should also be time to answer questions or concerns you may have and take the time to pray for you. You will receive an email well in advance from your pastor to set up a time to call you (and your family) along with a framework of the discussion you will have. Our aim is to make this simple and respect your time by keeping the conversation to about twenty minutes.

What this doesn’t mean:

We never want to make these calls feel like you are going to a clinic in some unknown town to visit a doctor you’ve never seen. We hope to be more like a family doctor who knows you and you know and trust. In other words, these calls are not a “check the box” impersonal duty, but rather a loving responsibility we believe will help you thrive spiritually.

3. Confidentiality

What this means:

Your dirty laundry will not be making the pastor’s sermon on Sunday, nor are you going to hear your news coming back to you from other people like a boomerang. Your pastor will not relay your struggles, sins, and other confidential information to others in the church.

What this doesn’t mean:

There are a couple of exceptions to this rule. First, if we hear of a felony you’ve committed, we are obligated to inform proper authorities. Secondly, if there is a church discipline issue, we can’t say we will keep it confidential if we plan on honoring Matthew 18:15-17 where an unrepentant sinner is brought before the church. Bear in mind that only repeated, long-lasting unrepentant sin will be brought to the church.  This means that until you've been approached by one, then by two or three, then by the elders about willing sin in your life and you refuse to pursue "turning" or "repenting" from that sin, the church body won’t be informed.  We will not bring "sin struggles" before the church.  Those are sins that, though you struggle with them and sometimes still commit them, you recognize them as sin and are actively working and praying toward ending them.

4. Availability

What this means:

You will have your pastor’s contacts, and he will be available to your needs especially when there is a crisis.

What this doesn’t mean:

Your small group is the first place of primary care for you – your group is like first responders. So, don’t let your pastor take the place of the primary care of your group. Your group will handle such things like meal trains, daily visits, and the such. Also, your primary one-on- one discipleship most likely will not come directly from your pastor, but more than likely another partner or group member.

5. Presence in crisis and celebrations

What this means:

If you or your immediate family is in the hospital, going through a crisis such as death, marital problems, or troubled children, your pastor’s presence is significant. Your pastor can be present, not only in times of crisis, but also in times of celebration like a child’s birth, occasional parties, or other celebrations of milestones. Proper protocol would be first to contact your small group and then your pastor.

What this doesn’t mean:

Just to reiterate point number 1, our pastors carry an extremely heavy burden of caring for their families and the partners under their care. However, that doesn’t mean you are a bother or we don’t want to be with you in crisis and celebrations. It just means we may need a little time to put some things in order before we get to you.

6. Some questions

What this means:

He will ask you questions about your life. He wants to know your struggles, your sins, and your shortcomings. He doesn’t just want to know about the bad things-- but the joyful things, too. The important aspect here is sharing and communicating. Your pastor can’t be faithful to shepherd you if you are not open and honest with him. So expect some probing questions during the shepherding calls – it's just because he loves you and wants the best for you.

What this doesn’t mean:

He won’t be asking creepy or inappropriate questions. He won’t be judgmental and condemning when you are struggling with issues. He will be loving, professional and understanding.

7. Prayer covering

What this means:

Your pastor will consistently pray for you by name each week.  What an honor for your pastor to pray for you and what a privilege for a man of God to constantly be lifting you up to the Lord!

You may get a text from him sometimes saying, “praying for you,” or “How can I pray for you?” If you are in need of prayer, send your pastor an email or text to let him know how he can pray.

What this doesn’t mean:

When we say we are “praying for you,” it's not some meaningless, non-existent jargon we are speaking. We mean it - we are actually asking the God of all creation, King of Heaven and Earth, to act on your behalf for His glory and your good.

8. Disappointments

What this means:

Your pastor WILL mess up. And, it's not if, but when. The truth is that your pastor is flesh and blood – a mere man who sins and makes mistakes. Please be patient with him as he wholeheartedly desires to shepherd and care for you well. Keep in mind that if he never knows he disappointed you, he never will be able to address, fix, repent or handle it. He needs to know when disappointments happen so that both of you can grow.

What this doesn’t mean:

Your pastor will never use this expectation as an excuse to fail you. Even though he may disappoint and fail, that doesn’t let him off the hook. One great thing about having a plurality of elders is that we will be holding one another accountable too. Please continue to pray for us as we strive to meet these expectations! We are looking forward to the next months and years of serving and loving you toward Jesus.

Part 1 of 3: What is Pastoral Care?

Jesus is a shepherd to His people – He is the Good Shepherd, Great Shepherd, and Chief Shepherd. This shepherd imagery gives a clear vision of His comprehensive care for His people to know them, feed them, lead them and protect them. So, it would only make sense that He would use the same metaphor to describe those He calls to lead and care for His flock. Under the headship of Jesus, our elders at Greenbriar Church are the primary overseers and shepherds (pastors) of His church.

To verify both of these realities, we can observe in Acts 20 that Paul called the elders of the church in Ephesus to meet with him. He told them the Holy Spirit made them ‘overseers’ to ‘shepherd’ [GK poimainein which is the word we get ‘pastor’ from] the Church of God, (Acts 20:17-18,28). Another great way to describe elders/pastors is simply “servant leaders.” Elders lovingly lead and give oversight, not to lord their authority over God’s people, but to humbly serve them in truth in love.  The first place we find the notion of a servant leader is from Jesus Himself, who said that “even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mat 20:28 ESV).

How do pastors serve the church in leadership?  By shepherding “the flock of God that is among you, exercising oversight, not under compulsion, but willingly, as God would have you; not for shameful gain, but eagerly;” (1 Peter 5:2 ESV). Paul says something similarly to the elders at Ephesus, commanding them to “pay careful attention to yourselves and to all the flock, in which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers, to care for the church of God, which he obtained with his own blood,” (Acts 20:28 ESV).  The fundamental responsibility of church leaders is to shepherd the flock of God.

So how does a shepherd (pastor) care for the flock? We can define “shepherding care” this way: Pastors exercise Shepherding Care in the local church by knowing, feeding, leading and protecting the flock through oversight and personal relationships.  Let’s take a look at how Shepherding Care takes place through oversight and personal relationships in the four categories of knowing, feeding, leading and protecting.

Knowing

Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you. (Hebrews 13:17 ESV)

Pastors have been tasked to keep watch over the souls of the flock. That is a tremendous responsibility and one that we do not take lightly. As a matter of fact, one of the main reasons we have created a comprehensive shepherding plan is because of the weight of this passage. We will be held accountable for how we care for God’s flock. For us to shepherd well, we first must know our partners.

Knowing by Oversight

Knowing requires the elders/pastors to be able to identify the sheep for whom they are accountable to the Lord. The best way for us to know who we are spiritually responsible for is to distinguish between the guests and partners of our church. We have designed our partnership experience for this reason.  Those who sign covenants to partner with the Greenbriar Church family are who we are accountable to before the Lord. In this partnership process, not only do we discover who we are spiritually responsible for, but we also get to know you by hearing your story. We want to know that you have been converted and that you are on a path to discipleship.

Knowing by Personal Relationship

We will be contacting our partners on a consistent, deliberate basis each year to check on your overall spiritual health. On these calls, will pray with you, answer questions, or address any concerns you may have. However, the primary responsibility we have is to make sure discipleship is thriving in your life. Your assigned pastor will email you in advance to set up a time for you (and your family) to get together either via phone or in person. Making hospital visits, caring for families during a crisis, and any other pastoral care for our partners will also be considered “knowing by personal relationship.”

Feeding

“Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep,” (John 21:17 ESV).

It is the responsibility of every pastor to make sure the sheep are well nourished through the preaching and teaching of the Word of God.

Feeding through Oversight

Our Sunday morning gathering is a time not only for corporate worship but also to learn more about the Word. Our sermons are intentional and well thought out in advance. We address current, relevant issues by teaching how the Gospel speaks to us about them. We also teach verse by verse through a couple of books of the Bible each year. Sermon series campaigns are yet another way we strive to feed the flock.

Feeding through Personal Relationship

One of our primary objectives for our personal meetings with partners is to ask how you are doing in the area of discipleship. We believe that if a partner is growing in being a better disciple (learning, following, and reproducing) of Jesus Christ, then he/she will certainly be healthier. Therefore, most of our personal meeting with you will be centered on how their discipleship is increasing.

Leading

Not domineering over those in your charge, but being examples to the flock. (1 Peter 5:3 ESV)

Pastors do not drive sheep; they lead sheep. The best way to lead is by example.

Leading by Oversight

By regularly and clearly stating our vision, we are helping to lead our flock to make disciples and plant churches. We share our vision through teaching, partnership experience, small groups, creativity and art, and a whole slew of different ways. Our aim is to be examples in living out our God-given vision for others to see.

Leading by Personal Relationship

We practice church discipline for the purpose of a sinning partner’s repentance and restoration so that they may flourish and glorify God. We also help lead others through giving counsel and helping them find ongoing counseling if necessary.

Protecting

I know that after my departure fierce wolves will come in among you, not sparing the flock; (Acts 20:29 ESV)

The world is always preaching powerful sermons about how you’re to live your life. However, it’s a shepherd’s job to share truth in love to protect the sheep from false teaching.

Protecting by Oversight

We are always teaching truth each Sunday and creating safe environments through small groups for you to hear the truth and be protected by false doctrine and beliefs. We tackle tough topics through preaching and writing, and we are constantly pointing people toward Jesus!

Protecting by Personal Relationship

We say hard things by speaking the truth in love. Instead of letting things fly under the radar to avoid confrontation, we embrace opportunities to speak truth to our partners. This is love. Hate is not saying anything if we thought someone was heading for a cliff. However, we love our partners and want to see them thrive rather than be destroyed by sin. We also desire to protect the innocent who don’t have fathers or husbands. We protect the widows and orphans from crafty people who want to exploit them. Another way we protect is a continual commitment to pray for each partner.

We ask you to be patient with us as we strive to serve you to the best of our ability. Each elder has the full-time job of leading his own family and also working to provide for his family. Shepherding Care is not easy especially in a busy culture, but it is worth it in the long run for all involved.